Ok Jaanu is the story of Adi and Tara who meet at a church-wedding. Adi is a game designer from Lucknow who has dreams of settling in US, while Tara, works at an architecture firm and wishes to go to Paris. Charmed by each other and knowing that they both have to leave the country in a couple of months. They decide to move-in together and make the best of time. What follows is a tale of intense romance between the two which turns into fighting as the day of them leaving the country comes nearby. Can they solve their situation?

Buzz:

Ok Jaanu is a remake of Tamil director Mani Ratnam’s 2015 hit O Kadhal Kanmani, which starred Dulquer Salmaan and Nithya Menen. This movie marks the second collaboration of Aditya and Shraddha, the first one being Aashiqui 2 which was a huge success. The director Shaad Ali had made Saathiya, remake of Mani Ratnam’s Tamil hit, ‘Alaipayuthey’.

Ok Jaanu

What To Anticipate:

It seems Shaad Ali banked too much on his success of Saathiya and also on the chemistry of Aditya and Shraddha in Aashiqui 2. Because, at both fronts, the movie calls for disappointment. The movie does carry the feels and vibes of Saathiya, but it delves into a very normal love-story. Also, the chemistry between the two actors seems a bit lost.

To be true, Shraddha’s acting seems monotonous. She has almost the same set of expressions, you would have seen in Aashiqui 2 or Ek Villain or Baaghi. Similar can be said for Aditya. At the same time, you also seem to question the storyline, which obviously has nothing new. The characters seem to be written casually.

One of the most irritating elements in the movie is the forced, Ok Jaanu, after every 5 minutes, as if they are trying to make the public realise that yes, they are watching Ok Jaanu and not some other movie. Shraddha explaining architecture as passion and life and equating it with romance is a big downer.

 

The whole idea of live-in relationships, eventually turning into can’t-let-go romantic relationships seems absurd. It seems, Bollywood knows no other angle to this story. Be it Befikre or Cocktail or Salaam Namaste. Bollywood seems to be growing on recurring clichéd stuff. The first half of the movie is all rain-dance and the second half, creating tensions towards a climax.

The things that sure catch your attention are some of the good dialogues of the movie, which have been penned by Gulzar and also the filming of the scenes around the local trains to the whole of Mumbai. That is worth appreciating.

Despite their small role, you will like the characters of Naseerudin Shah and Leela Samson in the movie and wish that there could have been more screen space and time to their story.

For a movie, where the love-story hinges on a career crisis, it really doesn’t seem that big of a crisis and also the climax seems more clichéd than ever. Do the ‘right thing’.

Trailer: